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20121201
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by jamelle buoy. a staff writer for the american prospect magazine and "washington post" reporter, suzy kim. kevin williamson, dep deputy mag editor and a nonprofit group that advocates for social and economic equality. we're one day away from what most media are calling the fiscal cliff. if political concoction enacted by congress to frighten itself into passing deficit reduction measures which means unless congress acts in the next 48 hours the bush tax cuts will expire along with federal unemployment insurance and a broad package of the spending cuts including defense spending will take effect. do weeks of fruitless negotiations and john boehner and senate leader are working on a deal this morning to avoid the fiscal cliff, or as chris hayes and i call it, the fiscal curve. the deadline is soft. it's not like every american is going to be handed a bill on january 1st and there's way to manage the damage if the country goes over. the senate is set to convene this afternoon with the house to follow tonight. there's a chance that a compromise will be reached, less than 48 hours before tax r
right now in washington, and i was cheered to see the president's opening bid, but the consensus in washington is that we have to come up with a grand bargain, dot dot dot we have to do something with entitlements. this is the big thing. something about entitlements. i just don't understand why that's the case. the reason i don't understand why that's the case is the big problem is the rate of growth of health care costs. i think we can all agree on that, right? >> yes. >> now medicare -- the rate of growth in medicare is significantly lower than the rate of growth of health care costs in the private sector. it's doing a better job of controlling cost relative to the private sector. then we just passed a huge bill that was incredibly contentious, which is called the affordable care act. the vast majority of the legislative language of which is about controlling costs in health care over the future. so it seems to me like the reasonable thing to do is to wait four years, five years, implement the bill and see if the cost control measures that have been put it in place, fought abou
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